Posts tagged "world"
My [UberX] driver turned out to be a Google employee who said he drew the lucky H1-B visa straw to get out of Bulgaria … he told me he works at the company’s Mountain View campus, but started driving for UberX for two hours on Saturdays and Sundays to send money to a family of four kids he met on vacation, who couldn’t afford to go to school or even shoes. ‘I just calculated that if I work four hours of a week, I can clothe all of them,’ he told me. ‘For so little, it’s amazing what you can do.’
(via Valleywag)
At least 7,776 languages are in use in the greater offline world … Less than five percent of languages in use now exist online.
How the Internet is killing the world’s languages
There is now a menace which is called Twitter. The best examples of lies can be found there. To me, social media is the worst menace to society.
Recep Tayyip Erdogan | Social media and opposition to blame for protests, says Turkish PM 
The digital divide is not a problem in itself, but a symptom of deeper, more important divides: of income, development and literacy[…] So even if it were possible to wave a magic wand and cause a computer to appear in every household on earth, it would not achieve very much: a computer is not useful if you have no food or electricity and cannot read.
The Economist, 2005 (via The Atlantic)
There’s a lot of discussion in the world about the two billion that are connected. We spend all day talking about the issues of e-commerce and start-ups and globalisation and so forth, and we forget that the majority of people are not online and that they will come online, the majority of them in the next five years.

It’s going to happen very fast. It’s going to happen in countries which don’t have the same principles that we in America have from the British legal system – around law and privacy and those sorts of things. All sorts of crazy stuff is going to happen. Human societies can’t change that fast without both good and negative implications.

…The future for us is great. The quality of life of the first world just gets better and better and better. But for these people, they’re going to go through a rough patch where all this information shows up and they can’t quite figure out what to do.
Eric Schmidt | The future according to Mr Google (via ParisLemon)
This is the Google Street View “car” for Iqaluit, Nunavut, Canada 

It’s called the Trekker. They use it to map places where cars can’t reach… Iqaluit only receives a few ships every summer capable of off-loading vehicles. And that space is extremely expensive and very valuable to the community. So realistically, Google probably couldn’t get a Streetview Car out there.

(via reddit)

This is the Google Street View “car” for Iqaluit, Nunavut, Canada 

It’s called the Trekker. They use it to map places where cars can’t reach… Iqaluit only receives a few ships every summer capable of off-loading vehicles. And that space is extremely expensive and very valuable to the community. So realistically, Google probably couldn’t get a Streetview Car out there.

(via reddit)


Like nails sticking out of would-be construction sites, China’s so-called ‘nail houses’ remain standing as long as their owners refuse to make way for development—sometimes becoming symbols of resistance. (via WSJ.com)

Like nails sticking out of would-be construction sites, China’s so-called ‘nail houses’ remain standing as long as their owners refuse to make way for development—sometimes becoming symbols of resistance. (via WSJ.com)

Most Web pages can be connected in 19 clicks or less, thanks to search engines, large aggregators and social networking sites, according to a paper on network science by Hungarian physicist Albert-László Barabási. As the Smithsonian magazine reported, these sites act as hubs for the Web at large — or, as Smithsonian’s Joseph Stromberg puts it, the “Kevin Bacons” of the Web.
Most Web pages can be connected in 19 clicks, study says
How hard is it to disconnect a country from the Internet, really?

The key to the Internet’s survival is the Internet’s decentralization — and it’s not uniform across the world…. Here’s a map of the world, with countries colored according to the Internet diversity at the international frontier. 

How hard is it to disconnect a country from the Internet, really?

The key to the Internet’s survival is the Internet’s decentralization — and it’s not uniform across the world…. Here’s a map of the world, with countries colored according to the Internet diversity at the international frontier. 

China’s newest tourist attraction… a glass-bottomed walkway around a cliff face 

On one side a sheer rock face, on the other a 4,000ft drop - and all to separate the brave traveller from a deadly plunge is a 3ft-wide, 2.5in thick walkway.  Tianmen Mountain in Zhangjiajie, China.

China’s newest tourist attraction… a glass-bottomed walkway around a cliff face 

On one side a sheer rock face, on the other a 4,000ft drop - and all to separate the brave traveller from a deadly plunge is a 3ft-wide, 2.5in thick walkway.  Tianmen Mountain in Zhangjiajie, China.

A Gargantuan Map Of The Internet: 196 COUNTRIES. 350,000 SITES. 2,000,000 LINKS. 1 GIANT PICTURE. 

In the end, Enikeev created a snapshot of the Internet in 2011, when Google and Facebook ruled the roost—a point clear in their sheer enormity, and their position in the center of the universe, serving as an associative glue across the web… When you couple this association with the country-specific color-coding, you see that China (yellow) and the US (blue) are in a clash of control of the Internet, with Russia (red) and Japan (purple) hanging around the periphery.

A Gargantuan Map Of The Internet: 196 COUNTRIES. 350,000 SITES. 2,000,000 LINKS. 1 GIANT PICTURE. 

In the end, Enikeev created a snapshot of the Internet in 2011, when Google and Facebook ruled the roost—a point clear in their sheer enormity, and their position in the center of the universe, serving as an associative glue across the web… When you couple this association with the country-specific color-coding, you see that China (yellow) and the US (blue) are in a clash of control of the Internet, with Russia (red) and Japan (purple) hanging around the periphery.

A World With More Phones Than People

A new report from the World Bank details the astounding growth of mobile since the year 2000. Then — just 12 years ago — there were less than a billion mobile subscriptions worldwide. Today, there are more than 6 billion and the count will “will soon exceed that of the human population,” according to the Bank (it is common in many countries for one person to own multiple SIM cards). Three-quarters of the world population now has access to a mobile phone.
Even at the height of landline subscriptions there were “only” about one billion globally, and it took more than a century to get there. 

A World With More Phones Than People

A new report from the World Bank details the astounding growth of mobile since the year 2000. Then — just 12 years ago — there were less than a billion mobile subscriptions worldwide. Today, there are more than 6 billion and the count will “will soon exceed that of the human population,” according to the Bank (it is common in many countries for one person to own multiple SIM cards). Three-quarters of the world population now has access to a mobile phone.

Even at the height of landline subscriptions there were “only” about one billion globally, and it took more than a century to get there. 

I currently lead marketing for the New York office of Definition 6. Master's in Digital Media from Georgia Tech. ATL->SFO->NYC.

courtenay.bird@definition6.com

twitter.com/courtenaybird

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