“Getting stores back up and running after natural disasters has become something of an art…

“Getting stores back up and running after natural disasters has become something of an art form for large companies, and nearly every major restaurant and retail chain has developed a way to contend with this brand of weather-related chaos. ‘We have an operations response team, and this is all that they do,’ says a Cracker Barrel spokeswoman. ‘The team deals with natural disasters.’”

Corporate “jump teams” spring to action during hurricanes, wading into chaos to reopen stores

Of the most talked-about tech companies, Facebook by far received the least love. While Amazon, Apple and Google all ranked in the top five with total scores above eighty out of 100, and Microsoft ranked 15th with a “good” score above 75, Facebook came in 42nd – sandwiched between Best Buy and T-Mobile – with a score of just over 65, or what Fronk described as the borderline between “average” and “poor.”

“Facebook suffers badly from lack of trust,” Fronk said.

Amazon arguably collects as much personal data about its customers as Facebook does about its users, or at least if not as much, then possibly more intimate: purchase history, product search history, home address, credit card numbers.

‘Amazon is predominantly a virtual company where you don’t get to see the people. You don’t see brick and mortar,’ says Robert Fronk, executive vice-president of reputation management at Harris. ‘For them to first of all have the highest reputation, but more importantly to be the company with far and away the highest emotional appeal, is amazing.’ Harris defines emotional appeal as trust, admiration and respect, not whether you get weepy when your package arrives.

Are we becoming a world without big companies?

Are we becoming a world without big companies?